Skip to main content

Health Policy Implementation Summary

Kevin Hague MP
Kevin Hague MP
kevin [dot] hague [at] parliament [dot] govt [dot] nz (Email)

Go to the full Health Policy

Health Policy Implementation Summary

Funding

Match increasing need for health services with increased funding to enable us to keep pace with the growing need for all kinds of health services. National has prioritised new motorways and tax cuts for the rich over maintaining the capacity of health services.

Prioritising prevention and early treatment

Focus especially on increasing investment in services, based on evidence, aimed at preventing illness and on community-based treatment and support services. These have sustained funding cuts under National despite providing the most efficient health gain. We have already announced that visits to nurses or doctors and prescription charges will be free for under 18's, and there will be a nurse for every decile 1-4 school.

The big three: tobacco, alcohol and obesity

Re-introduce comprehensive programmes, including regulation and legislation where supported by the evidence, to prevent illness caused by tobacco, alcohol and other drugs, and unhealthy food and drink. For more information, see our Diabetes Action Plan and our Health Heart Action Plan.

Effectively improving unhealthy environments

Recognise the interaction between a person's health outcomes and other sectors like housing, education, employment and income support. We would require government agencies to work together to help people improve outcomes in all these aspects of their lives, and to work in partnership with communities.

Making primary care more affordable for those in the most need

Adjust the funding formula for primary care (general practice) to ensure there is no financial barrier to people accessing the care they need, and to ensure that services are proactive in taking care to those who are not currently getting the services they need.

Community involvement

Provide for more community involvement in health decisions, with greater freedom for DHBs to focus on local needs and a national conversation about how decisions should be made about what services are funded, and for whom.

Improving service quality, not cost-cutting

Make services better for patients and increase the efficient use of resources by improving service quality. We need a culture that encourages quality improvement cycles where evidence is used to drive experimental innovations, and those that work become standard across the whole of our system.

Workforce solutions

Commit to implementing solutions to health workforce problems that have been jointly developed by health professionals. Their unions and professional and regulatory organisations, district health boards, consumers, training institutions and other stakeholders.

Care at home

Properly fund services aimed at providing the kind of support that enables people to have their treatment and rehabilitation needs met in their own homes.

Aged care

Implement all recommendations of the Human Rights Commission's 'Caring Counts' report, to ensure quality of life for older people and fairness for those who care for them.

Integrating services

Continue to drive service integration, so that a person's interaction with health services is seamless across the entire system, rather than fragmented duplication of interactions with more or less independent silos. This is particularly important in the relationship between community-based and hospital-based care, and in the relationships between more specialised services (such as maternity or mental health services) with general healthcare services.

Whānau Ora

We would continue to support and strengthen Whānau Ora

Child and Youth Health

The Green Party has a special focus on providing the best possible start for children, with the aim that every child thrives. You can read our full package here.

^ Back to Top